On-Demand Resources

These on-demand resources allow people to get up-to-date, relevant and detailed information about general legal issues no matter the time of day or night. While many people benefit from viewing these resources, particularly as a first step towards solving a legal problem, often it is only by obtaining tailored advice that true answers can emerge.

Criminal Law – On-Demand Resources

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Centrelink FraudCentrelink fraud (sometimes referred to as 'Welfare Fraud' or 'Social Security Fraud') is regarded as a serious criminal offence in Australia, which is punishable by actual imprisonment. There are a number of different charges that may apply under the Commonwealth Criminal Code for cases of this kind.Viewcriminal-offencesfraud-and-financial-crimes
Drug Importation OffencesDrug importation offences under the Commonwealth Criminal Code can attract some of the highest penalties for drug offences in Australia, which generally reflects the commercial and coordinated efforts involved in such offences. The maximum penalty for importing a commercial quantity of border controlled drugs is life imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesdrug-offences
Possessing Dangerous DrugsFor a drug possession case in Queensland, the prosecution sets out to prove that (1) the person charged (2) unlawfully (4) possessed (5) a dangerous drug. Penalties vary considerably, from drug diversion orders in minor cases through to lengthy terms of imprisonment for serious cases of possessing dangerous drugs.Viewcriminal-offencesdrug-offences
Producing Dangerous DrugsProducing dangerous drugs is a serious criminal offence in Queensland. The definition of the word 'produce' in the Drugs Misuse Act (Qld) is extremely broad and allows individuals to be charged with producing a dangerous drug even though there may never be any dangerous drugs actually produced.Viewcriminal-offencesdrug-offences
Supplying Dangerous DrugsSupply dangerous drug charges a serious criminal offences in Queensland, which can be punishable by imprisonment. The definition of 'supply' in the Drugs Misuse Act (Qld) is extremely broad and allows individuals to be charged with supplying a dangerous drug even though there may never be a transaction or actual exchange of drugs.Viewcriminal-offencesdrug-offences
Drug TraffickingFor a drug trafficking case in Queensland, the prosecution sets out to prove that (1) the person charged (2) carried on the business of (3) unlawfully (4) trafficking in a (5) dangerous drug. In Queensland, the maximum penalty for carrying on the business of unlawful trafficking is 25 years' imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesdrug-offences
Attempted MurderFor an attempted murder case, the prosecution sets out to prove that the person charged unlawfully attacked or did something to another person with the intention of killing them, using means capable of doing so, but without death resulting. In Queensland, the maximum penalty for attempted murder is life imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offenceshomicide-offences violent-offences
Serious AssaultSerious assault is an offence in Queensland that is commonly charged when police officers are allegedly assaulted in the execution of their duties, the offence is also charged in other circumstances, such as in cases of assaults of elderly people or working corrective services officers.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
Malicious Act With IntentMalicious act with intent is a serious criminal offence, generally punishable by actual imprisonment. In Queensland, it generally is charged in cases in which a serious injury has been caused by someone who intended to cause such a result. The maximum penalty for a charge of malicious act with intent is life imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
Assault Occasioning Bodily HarmAssault occasioning bodily harm requires proof of an unlawful assault that caused bodily harm. The term 'bodily harm' refers to any bodily injury that interferes with health or comfort. The maximum penalty is 7 years' imprisonment, although if a circumstance of aggravation applies, it rises to a maximum of 10 years' imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
Unlawful WoundingUnlawful wounding is a serious criminal offence, often punishable by actual imprisonment. The word 'wounding' refers to a break of the true skin, often by a sharp object. A wound may be caused in any number of ways, such as by a knife or a bottle. The maximum penalty is 7 years imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
Common AssaultCommon assault is a criminal offence, which relates to the unlawful application of force, or threatened application of force in some circumstances, without consent. An assault is unlawful when it is not authorised, justified or excused. In Queensland, the offence of common assault has a maximum penalty of 3 years imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
Grievous Bodily HarmIn Queensland, grievous bodily harm is an offence under section 320 of the Criminal Code 1899 (Qld). Suffering life threatening or permanent injuries are examples of grievous bodily harm. The offence is punishable by up to 14 years imprisonment and may be deemed a 'serious violent offence'.Viewcriminal-offencesviolent-offences
ExtortionExtortion is a serious criminal offence, which may be punishable by actual imprisonment. While it is most commonly charged when threats of violence are used to blackmail a person to hand over property, other forms of coercion or intimidation can give rise to the offence of extortion in Queensland.Viewcriminal-offencesfraud-and-financial-crimes violent-offences
Unlawful Striking Causing DeathIn Queensland, punishment for unlawful striking causing death carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. Introduced to target the prevalence of 'coward punch' deaths, it removes what were common defences in cases where it is alleged the person killed was struck to the head or neck.Viewcriminal-offenceshomicide-offences
ManslaughterManslaughter may be proved in a number of ways, such as by criminal negligence or a deliberate act. An unlawful killing that does not meet the definition of murder may be deemed manslaughter. In Queensland, punishment for manslaughter carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offenceshomicide-offences
MurderThere are multiple definitions of what constitutes murder in Queensland, including murder by intentional harm or through ‘reckless indifference’. In Queensland, punishment for murder carries mandatory life imprisonment with a current minimum non-parole period of at least 20 years imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offenceshomicide-offences
Proceeds of CrimeProceeds of crime offences exist to make it unlawful to receive or possess property that is tainted by crime. While proceeds of crime laws are often used in relation to drug offences, their reach under the Criminal Proceeds Confiscation Act 2002 (Qld) and Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (Cth) covers all types of serious criminal offences.Viewcriminal-offencesfraud-and-financial-crimes
FraudFraud is a serious criminal offence in Queensland, which may be punishable by actual imprisonment. The essential element of the charge is proof of 'dishonesty', which requires the prosecution to prove that what a defendant did was dishonest by the standards of ordinary honest people.Viewcriminal-offencesfraud-and-financial-crimes
Industrial ManslaughterIndustrial manslaughter is a relatively new criminal offence in Queensland, having commenced on 23 October 2017. It targets business operators and senior officers in corporations who, through negligence, cause the death of a worker the course of carrying out their work. The maximum penalty is up to 20 years imprisonment.Viewcriminal-offenceshomicide-offences